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Keeping it real in Bali

A couple of weeks ago I posted about visiting the ‘genuine Bali’ – off the beaten tourist track, away from the pulsating night life and shopping, a fascinating paradise of traditional culture and natural wonder. The ‘real Bali’, if you like.

An article in the Sydney Morning Herald delves deeper into where and how to see the real Bali and comes up with the beaches around Rapture Surf Camp, located right on the Bukit. The author found it to be heaven, for both surfers and non-surfers alike:

My cousin, who was surfing on the Bukit Peninsula, south of the airport, urged me to get down there. I told him I didn’t surf. He said it didn’t matter. He was right. A handful of gorgeous, quiet, sandy beaches studded the western coastline. Padang Padang and Bingin were secluded little charmers, where surfers paddled out to catch board-crunching breaks, non-surfers dozed under colourful umbrellas and down-to-earth Balinese cooked up satay, nasi goreng and mi goreng by the shore.

image credit: Sunova Surfboards (Flickr CC)

Sounds pretty good, huh? And the author isn’t even a surfer.

What’s more is the Bukit’s proximity to the cliff-top temple of Uluwatu, famous for its traditional Balinese Hindu culture and mischievous monkeys.

Of course the surfing on the Bukit is beyond compare – and that is even by Bali’s high standards.

Uluwatu itself is a top surf spot with 6 sections and big swells, while Padang Padang is the Balinese pipeline. Impossibles is a fast reef break, Bingin is great for barrels and Dreamland is a beautiful wide beach, which is perfect for beginner surfers.

Read more about Bali’s best surf breaks here.

About graham.land

Graham Land is a writer who grew up in the suburbs of Washington, DC, where he was part of the local hardcore punk scene. Through this musical movement he became involved in grass roots interests such as anti-racist activism, animal rights and Ecology. In 2000 he relocated to Europe, earning an MA in History from Malmö University in Sweden. Graham writes on a variety of topics including the environment, politics and history.
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